History Flies off the Hammer for £1.6m

I have developed new obsession of sorts. I’ve been consumed with a passion for the exploring the personal stories from World War Two. Not the whole battles and glory type thing – don’t get me started on the futility of war – but the accounts of people that lived through it.

Accordingly I’ve been almost swallowing books by fighter pilots that flew throughout and in the Battle of Britain and have developed a love for the Spitfire. So, while scouring the news for related stories I was shocked to find that there are thought to be only 44 left in an airworthy state. spitfire

Whilst I appreciate that these Spitfires may be a bit trickier to maintain than an RC plane, given that Merlin spares don’t come easily, you would have thought that cooler heads should’ve prevailed and decided that these birds were an historical icon and a few more needed saving for posterity. 

Obviously not, though, as one of the few remaining Spitfires changed hands this week for just under £1.6 million. One lucky Londoner shelled out £1,580,000 for a twin-seater that had been restored to airworthiness over four years. Delivered to the RAF in 1944 it moved to South Africa four years later, where records are murky of it’s service which ended in 1954. 

While we’re not talking about a Battle of Britain flyer here, this plane is nonethless one of historical import and I, for one, say well done to its new owners and really really wish it were mine. Or that they’d at least take me up in the back seat while the weather’s still good.

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