Posts Tagged ‘news’

It goes without saying that people are anxious to leave the less-than-sunny shores (in more ways than just the weather) of Great Britain lately. This blog has often pointed out the record stats of those flocking Down Under or departing for Dubai.

Close To Europe?!

Close To Europe?!

Now though, it seems some countries might be feeling left out of the population jumps and are advertising the pros of becoming a resident within them. A Brazilian tourist representative, keen to attract those moving abroad, has said of the Rio Grande Du Norte Francisco Cipriano de Paulo Segundo area (try getting that on your envelope) as having “a lot of good wonderful beaches, 410 km of beach with warm  water and we are very close to Europe. The Natal district is closer to Europe than all of Brazil.”

Given that the heart of Brazil is some 6,000 plus miles from the middle of Europe, even going edge-to-edge is still only going to carve a fraction off that. I don’t really think it’s fair to say that it’s close to Europe. It’s like saying the BNP are close to being the next government. Both a long way off.

Still, they’re pretty up there in the beach catergory though.

Meanwhile, there’s been an interesting claim recently that the Eurostar – a wonderful service, don’t get me wrong – has made international removals easier. The Times, infact, has noted that now it’s so easy to travel to areas of France, Germany and the Low Countries – thanks to connections with the TGV – has encouraged property buyers to look further afield.

In fact, Assetz Martin, an international property firm, even said that “Eurostar’s connection to the TGV has opened up areas of the south-west of France, which previously had been hard to get to.”

Of course it has, for holidaying. In fact, if you’re looking to visit Paris there really is no better, easier or cheaper way. However, connecting to the TGV and then trawling across France isn’t so cost-friendly as, say, a flight from Heathrow.

However, for international removals, unless you’re looking to move your entire life in the confines of a couple of suitcase, I really fail to see how the Eurostar is going to help. I recently assisted in an international move, from Paris to the UK. In a van, along the highways and across in a ferry. There’s no way the Eurostar could really have helped with that let alone if it were to Germany or the South.

And, trust me, having endured a hell-like weekend in doing so, I would thoroughly recommend getting the professionals in instead.

It’s strange how fast some places can develop, almost scary. Take Dubai: I’d never heard of it as a kid, even into the nineties I don’t recall it being mentioned that much, certainly not in terms of  “wow, have you seen what they’re building out there?”dubai

Now though, the emirate’s constantly changing skyline and rapid development is famous and barely a week goes by without one of those emails showing some stupidly ambitious development or building arriving. Accordingly, it’s attracting a lot of foreigners and not just on holiday terms.

Not so long ago I took a TEFL course and there were some pretty impressive salaries available over in Dubai but I’m not one for high temperatures. But that’s just me. Of all the people moving overseas, 25,000 of them move to Dubai every month. Staggering, but the tax advantages, heat and way of life mean the population there is expected to go from 1.6 million now to 4 million by 2020.

25,000 a month… that equates to 800 a day. Or 33 every hour! No wonder it’s changing so fast – is it a case of meeting demand for property or people going because there’s so much available property. While it’s not quite a chicken / egg case it’s a quandry. I would say “won’t they run out of room?” but that doesn’t seem to be a concern as fast as they’re building outwards they’re building upwards too.

It’s one of those places that’s so remarkable I’d really like to visit it, though I’m still pretty sure I wouldn’t want to live there.

The population of the UK hit a new high of 61.4 million in the middle of 2008. This jump in population is despite a drop in migration to the country since 2007 since the government have started the biggest clampdown on immigration since World War 2.

So while Immigration Minister Phile Woolas informs us that our borders are tighter than ever – and anyone who’s looked at the immigration requirements will testify to this – our population is stil growing thanks to the highest birth rate since 1973.

Somewhat hypocritically though, while our government feeds the red-top tabloids by making it increasingly harder for foreigners to think of UK removals, the amount of British people making use of other countries’ immigration rules continues to grow.

As if there’s just too many of us to stay put, the number of us emmigrating overseas to Australia grew again in 2008. In fact, 395,000 Brits decided that all the bad weather, bad leadership and recession was enough and that Australia seemed a far better destination. Most of them through the Australian General Skilled Migration Programme – after all, they’re crying out for workers over there.

Not just Australia either, three Britons quit the country every minute. While you may say “it’s nothing to do with the government” you’d be wrong – since 1997, two million UK nationals have decided on emmigrating overseas. It is the largest level of emigtation since the first World War. And what happened in 1997? Yep, Labour’s coming of power.

If the Conservatives make government as seems so inevitable, I can’t see our borders opening up. If we continue getting out at the same rate, will there be any of us Brits left?

There’s something about Alfa Romeos that inspire a strange sense of pride in their owners. While the Italian manufacturer was once a bit of a marmite-like quality amongst dealers it’s really climbing in terms of popularity and car sales lately. Especially with the likes of the new MiTo taking it to a previously un-tapped market.

It’s a shame then, for us owners of Alfas, to find that two of the company’s models feature in Glass’s list of cars retaining the least of their original list value after 3 years. Top offender on the list was the executive contender that never really was, the doomed 166. Sadly, despite this vehicles many qualities it never really sold and dropped off forecorts in 2007. Which goes some way toward explaining why it’s top of the list, retaining just 14.4% of its original value. Given that this one used to go for around £30k… ouch.

For Just 15% of Original Price?

For Just 15% of Original Price?

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Anybody who’s caught half an episode a show like Grand Designs knows how great timber buildings can be in terms of architecture and stablility.

Thing is there’s been a lot of mixed press as to just how sustainable and green timber is as a building product. You can’t go anywhere near a building yard at your local garden centre without hearing about forestry regualtions but lately there’s been talk about how timber buildings aren’t that beneficial to the environment. Apparently when trees are converted for building purposes the CO2 is trapped and stored.

Now, though, a bit of good news. Using timber for large-scale commercial buildings is beneficial for the environment. The energy use over a 60-year life cycles of buildings constructed with concrete, steel, timber and ‘timber-plus’ has shown that the ‘timber-plus’ offers the lowest environmental impact.

Using timber for a building’s structure and fit-out produces 4,500 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivelent comparred to timber’s 5,454 tonnes and the close-to 7,000 tonnes produced by a steel built commercial building.

While this is probably massive news to those in the building trade or with an ultra-fine eye for eco details, to me it means two things. Firstly that at least these things are being considered and secondly that I can still watch Grand Designs and enjoy the timber buildings without worrying about how “green” it makes a building.

I’m constantly toying with the idea of moving to France again so I’m always following the news and keeping an eye on the possibilities opening up for moving overseas.

So today I found a news story about how, despite the global recession, Australia is still looking to grow and trying to attract overseas candidates to fill key positions. These are areas where skill sets are lacking locally and are outside of the key metropolitan areas like Melbourne and Perth etc. Though not exactly in Belongtamick.

The report stated that despite higer levels of unemployment in Australia, there is still a key skill shortage in many areas. Accordingly, they’re hoping that more people will consider moving to Australia to fill said vacancies.

If this is the case, and Australia are sincere about wanting more people to head Down Under, then perhaps they should consider their immigration requirements. As it stands, it’s one of the toughest countries to get into! You have to provide a wealth of information, have a fair bit of wealth yourself, demonstrate your clean records and levels of character and pass various stringent requirements. I’d quite easily pass said requirements but the sheer amount of red tape, for an ex-prison colony, is enough to put me off even thinking about it.

I genuinely wonder how many people with the skills they’re looking for have been deterred from contemplating the move simply because of the hassle involved in getting approved to move.

International removals are never easy, but the level of requirement makes Australia look like the trickiest there is, even excluding distance. While it’s surely a wonderful lifestyle available there, perhaps they should ease up on the restrictions before moaning they don’t have enough skilled workers.